Great Land of Alaska

2008-2009 Redoubt Eruption

In November of 2008, seismic activity under Redoubt became high enough that the AVO and U.S. Geological Survey raised the volcano's Concern Level to YELLOW and later ORANGE. Beginning in mid-March of 2009, Redoubt underwent a series of explosive eruptions and the Concern Level was raised to RED as ash plumes were sent as high as 60,000 feet (18,288 meters) above sea level. Over a 14 day explosive eruption period in March and April 2009, Redoubt underwent a total of 19 explosive events. After the end of the explosive eruption phase in early April, Redoubt entered a lava dome building phase and its Concern Level was lowered back to ORANGE. As the unstable lava dome was showing no sign of collapse that would lead to another explosive event, Redoubt was downgraded to YELLOW in June 2009. In September 2009, Redoubt was downgraded to GREEN as a lava dome collapse or other explosive event became more unlikely.

Increased and sustained earthquake activity near Redoubt's summer on December 28, 2009 prompted AVO to raise Redoubt's Concern Level from GREEN to YELLOW. The chances of explosive activity or lava dome failure were not known at the time. By January 5, 2010, activity at Redoubt had diminished enough that the Concern Level was lowered back to Green.

Uncredited photographs below are my own photographs. All others have the credit provided.

September 27, 2008

Fumaroles and cracks

Fumarole activity and newly cracked ice atop Redoubt, a sign of things to come.

(Picture credit: Bull, Kate; Image courtesy of AVO / ADGGS)

Sepbember 27, 2008

Large hole in ice

A large ice hole that appeared to have running water within it.

(Picture credit: McGimsey, Game; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

November 2, 2008

Fumeroles and bare rock

Heat from fumaroles has exposed bare rock amongst the glaciers atop Redoubt's 1990 lava dome.

(Picture credit: McGimsey, Game; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

January 30, 2009

Steaming fumaroles

Steam from a large fumarole indicates the presence of an upsurge of magma.

(Picture credit: Wallace, Kristi; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

February 2, 2009

Muddy outflow

Muddy outflows and waterfalls indicate increasing heat in Redoubt's summit as magma nears the surface.

(Picture credit: Wallace, Kristi; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

March 15, 2009

Steam and light ash dusting Steam and light ash dusting

A small explosive event has left a thin layer of ash on Redoubt's glaciers.

(Picture credit: Bleick, Heather; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

March 23, 2009

Tank farm Tank farm

A tank farm near Redoubt would have been overrun by lahar deposits if it wasn't for the protective dike. Lahar deposits crossed over the dike in one small area. A nearby helipad, service building, and runway have been inundated by lahar flows.

(Picture credit: McGimsey, Game; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

March 26, 2009

Aerial shot of plume

An explosive event was captures on film by a Peninsula Airways pilot on March 26.

(Picture credit: Cole, Robert; Image courtesy of Robert Cole and PenAir)

March 26, 2009

Ash cloud over Kenai Ash cloud over Kenai Ash cloud over Kenai Ash cloud over Kenai

My workplace's location near the coast gave a good view of the March 26 explosive eruption's ash plume as it drifted over Kenai and Soldotna. The Tribe closed all offices and sent everybody home for fear of an ash fallout, but the airborne particles blew right over us.

March 28, 2009

Ash plume over Kenai Ash plume over Kenai Ash plume over Kenai

Another explosive event took place on March 28. We had taken our NYO athletes to an indoor water park to make up for missing a competition (due to volcanoes and avalanches). The explosion happened as we were leaving the water park and on our way to a pizza restaurant. Due to the approaching ash cloud, we had to skip pizza and send everybody home.

March 30, 2009

Explosive eruption

Another explosive eruption on March 30, 2009.

(Picture credit: Bleick, Heather; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

April 4, 2009

Aerial view of eruption

By April, Redoubt was still erupting but the explosive event had somewhat decreased in size.

(Picture credit: Bhargava, Raj)

April 11, 2009

Ash plume

A small explosive eruption on April 11.

(Picture credit: Anderson, Dennis)

May 16, 2009

Lava dome

A good view of Redoubt's active lava dome.

(Picture credit: McGimsey, Game; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)


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