Great Land of Alaska

2005-2006 Augustine Eruption

In late November or 2005, seismic activity under Augustine became high enough that the AVO and U.S. Geological Survey raised the volcano's Concern Level to YELLOW. Throughout December and January, the Concern Level changed between YELLOW, ORANGE, and RED as the volcano underwent different stages of seismic activity and eruption. Beginning on January 27 2006, Augustine started an ongoing eruption that constantly released an ash plume and pyroclastic flows. The eruption had quieted down by the end of February 2006, although seismic activity was still higher than normal and small rock slides and ash flows continued to be recorded. By late spring, this eruptive phase was over and Augustine was Concern Level was lowered back to GREEN.

December 12, 2005

Steaming summit

A couple weeks after the Concern Level was raised to YELLOW, Augustine emits some steam and ash.

(Picture credit: McGimsey, Game; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

January 12, 2006

Light ash emission from peak

By January, the plume released by Augustine contained more ash.

(Picture credit: McGimsey, Game; Image courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey)

January 13, 2006

Giant ash plume

One of Augustine's larger ash releases of this period occurred on January 13, sending a large plume over 34,000 feet (10,363 meters) into the sky.

(Picture credit: Andrew, Gerald)

January 17, 2006

Summit glow in dark

A long exposure picture taken at dusk shows the glow of the summit.

(Picture credit: Anderson, Dennis)

January 24, 2006

Large steam cloud

During Augustine's quieter periods at this time of eruption, ash levels are minimal and mostly steam is released from the crater.

(Picture credit: Wallace, Kristi; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

January 24, 2006

Geologists repairing web cam

A steaming Augustine looms in the background as two scientists repair the AVO webcam which was filled with snow during a blizzard.

(Picture credit: Coombs, Michelle; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

January 29, 2006

Eruption in progress Eruption in progress

A few days later, the repaired webcam catches these images of the beginning of an explosive eruption.

(Picture credit: Webcam, Augustine; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

January 30, 2006

Aerial shot of plume

A nice aerial shot of the plume of ash and steam ejected by Augustine.

(Picture credit: Schneider, Dave; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

January 30, 2006

Closer view of plume

A better view of the plume.

(Picture credit: Izbekov, Pavel; Image courtesy of AVO / UAF Geological Institute)

January 30, 2006

Good view of plume Plume trailing off into distance

A couple more views of the plume as it trails off to the northeast.

(Picture credit: McGimsey, Game; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

February 8, 2006

Steaming summit

Above the clouds is a good view of the steaming summit.

(Picture credit: Coombs, M. L.; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

February 8, 2006

View beneath the clouds

A view beneath the clouds shows some fresh snow with even fresher ash on top, as well as fresh lava/rock flows.

(Picture credit: McGimsey, Game; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

February 16, 2006

Lava dome

A good view of Augustine's new lava dome.

(Picture credit: McGimsey, Game; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

February 24, 2006

Dusty peak

The steaming peak, covered with both a fresh dusting of snow and volcanic ash.

(Picture credit: McGimsey, Game; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)

March 1, 2006

Steaming lava dome

A nice close-up of the new lava dome.

(Picture credit: McGimsey, Game; Image courtesy of AVO / U.S. Geological Survey)


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